Voter Guide - Caring Across Generations
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Voter Guide

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This election will determine the systemic and individual support family caregivers, care workers, seniors, and people with disabilities receive.

Pledge to vote by November 3rd!

Need to register to vote?

Many states have deadlines to register to vote in the upcoming Nov 3rd elections. Make sure you are registered to vote before the deadline in your state.
Register to Vote

Have I checked my voter registration status?

People move or sometimes voter registration databases purge voters from the rolls. Make sure you are still registered to vote at your current address.
Check your Status

Sign up to GOTV.

This election is going to determine the care agenda for decades to come, and your voice is critically important. Sign up to call caregivers across the country and Get Out The Vote!

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VOTING WHILE CAREGIVING
Download this guide as a PDF

Are you unsure about your best option for voting in the upcoming election?

As caregivers, there are special considerations to take into account before making a voting plan. Here are some things to consider before deciding your best voting option:

  1. Am I immunocompromised? YES ▢ NO ▢
  2. Do I live with or provide care for someone who is immunocompromised? YES ▢ NO ▢
  3. Do I provide care for someone who lives far from my own polling location? YES ▢ NO ▢
  4. Am I the only person providing care for a young child, a person with a disability or an older adult? YES ▢ NO ▢
  5. Do I have children and am I unable to arrange childcare for them for more than 3 hours? YES ▢ NO ▢
  6. Do I work on election day and cannot take time off to go to my polling location to vote?
    YES ▢ NO ▢
  7. Am I not able or willing to stand more than 3 hours in line to vote? YES ▢ NO ▢
  8. Can I not leave the person I care for alone for more than an hour? YES ▢ NO ▢

If you answer YES to one or more of these questions, your best options are to vote by mail or to vote early in person.

How do I vote by mail?

In response to COVID-19, many states have changed the process for requesting an absentee ballot. Some states, like California and Colorado, automatically send absentee ballots to registered voters.Other states like, Wisconsin and North Carolina, require voters to request a ballot. Other states, like Alabama and New York, require voters to provide an excuse to request an absentee ballot.
Some states already began to send absentee ballots to voters and many have deadlines to request one.

Make sure you register and request your ballot before your state’s deadline and with enough time to mail your ballot before election day.

Some states allow folks to return their absentee ballots in person at designated drop-off mailboxes.

Click here to learn more about how to vote by mail in your state.

How do I vote early?

Many states have instituted a period of time ahead of the Nov 3 election when voters can vote early. Some states will begin as early as mid-September. If your state does not have same-day voter registration, please make sure you check your voter registration status ahead of the election, and register by the deadline, if necessary.

This article has a list of states and when early voting begins in each.

Refer to the in-person voting checklist if you choose to vote early.

VOTING WHILE RECEIVING LONG TERM SUPPORTIVE SERVICES
Download this guide as a PDF

Are you unsure about your best option for voting in the upcoming election?

As people who receive care, there are special considerations to take into account before making a voting plan. Here are some things to consider:

  1. Am I immunocompromised? YES ▢ NO ▢
  2. Do I live with someone who is immunocompromised? YES ▢ NO ▢
  3. Do I need special accommodations or assistance at the polls? YES ▢ NO ▢
  4. Am I not able or willing to wait in line to vote? YES ▢ NO ▢
  5. Do I need to be driven to the polling location? YES ▢ NO ▢

If you answer YES to one or more of these questions, then your best option is to vote by mail.

How do I vote by mail?

In response to COVID-19, many states have changed the process for requesting an absentee ballot. Some states, like California and Colorado, automatically send absentee ballots to registered voters.Other states like, Wisconsin and North Carolina, require voters to request a ballot. Other states, like Alabama and New York, require voters to provide an excuse to request an absentee ballot.
Some states already began to send absentee ballots to voters and many have deadlines to request one.

Make sure you register and request your ballot before your state’s deadline and with enough time to mail your ballot before election day.

Some states allow folks to return their absentee ballots in person at designated drop-off mailboxes.

Click here to learn more about how to vote by mail in your state.

I WANT TO OR HAVE TO VOTE IN PERSON ON ELECTION DAY

As a result of COVID-19, we are encouraging folks to vote by mail or to vote early. However, if you absolutely must vote on Election Day, we want you to take precautions.

Here is a checklist of things you should consider when voting in person.

VOTING IN PERSON CHECKLIST:

  1. Where am I voting?
    1. Whether you are voting early or on election day, make sure you check your polling location before you leave. Sometimes polling locations are changed at the last minute.
      1. I use a wheelchair, scooter, walker, cane, or other assistive equipment to get around. Is the location accessible for me?
        1. Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act requires that state and local governments ensure that people with disabilities have a full and equal opportunity to vote. However, sometimes polling locations are not accessible. You can always ask for the polling locations to make accommodations to help you exercise your right to vote.
  2. How am I getting to the polling location?
    1. Do you need a ride? Sometimes polling locations get changed last minute, so try to find someone who is able to be flexible and communicate any changes with them as soon as possible.
  3. What time are you available to vote?
    1. Check what time the polls are open at your polling location and be prepared to wait in line during the early morning rush and after 5 pm.
    2. Figure out if you can make arrangements with your employer to arrive late to work because you decided to vote in the morning or to leave work early to vote at the end of the day.
  4. Who are you voting with?
    1. If you are a caregiver, do you have to make arrangements for someone to care for your loved one while you vote, or are you bringing them with you? What accommodations do you need if you are bringing your loved one with you to vote?
    2. If you receive care, who will assist you to get to the polling location and will that affect their ability to vote?
  5. Pack your valid driver’s license or state ID
    1. Some states ask for an ID when voting. Be sure to check ahead of time.
  6. Pack your masks and bring hand sanitizer and your own pen with black ink.
  7. Practice social distancing by staying at least 6 feet away from other people.
  8. Your polling place might have a long line of voters. If you cannot stand for a long period of time, consider bringing a small chair or stool to sit on while you wait
  9. Exercise your right to vote!


Check your voter registration status